What is an IEP?

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An Individualized Education Program (IEP) is a written statement that is developed for each child with a disability who is attending an elementary or secondary educational institution. It is designed to ensure that the child receives specialized instruction and related services to help them succeed in school. The IEP is developed by a team that includes individuals from various educational disciplines, the child with a disability, family members, and/or designated advocates. The IEP typically includes:
  • The child's present levels of academic achievement and functional performance.
  • Measurable annual goals and objectives for the child's education.
  • A description of the special education and related services the child will receive.
  • The extent to which the child will participate in the general education curriculum and in extracurricular activities.
  • Individualized accommodations necessary for the child to be successful.
  • Transition services for students aged 16 or older, including postsecondary goals and the services needed to achieve them.
The IEP process is governed by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which mandates that eligible children receive a free appropriate public education. The IEP is not just a legal document but a map that outlines the program of special education instruction, supports, and services a student needs to make progress and thrive in school.
What are some of the key terms related to an IEP?

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Here are some key terms related to Individualized Education Programs (IEPs):
  • Present Level of Performance (PLOP): A description of a student's current abilities, skills, and challenges.
  • Standards-Based IEP: An IEP that measures a student's academic performance against what the state expects of other students.
  • Specially Designed Instruction: Instruction that is tailored to meet the unique needs of a student with a disability.
  • Supplementary Aids and Services: Supports to help students learn in the general education classroom, such as equipment or assistive technology.
  • Related Services: Services a student needs to benefit from special education, such as transportation or occupational therapy.
  • Response to Intervention (RTI): A systematic way of identifying struggling students and providing extra help.
  • Transition Plan: A part of the IEP that lays out what a teen will learn and do in high school to thrive as a young adult.
  • Least Restrictive Environment (LRE): The concept that students with disabilities must be educated as much as possible with their non-disabled peers.
  • Modification: A change in what a student is expected to learn and demonstrate.
  • Parent Report: A letter families write to document their child's strengths, struggles, and success at school, at home, and in the community.
  • Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS): A proactive, schoolwide approach used to promote positive behavior and improve school safety.
  • Progress Reporting: How a school reports on student progress on annual goals.
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): The federal law that guarantees all students with disabilities access to a free, appropriate public education.
  • Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE): The right of students with disabilities to receive an education that meets their individual needs, provided at no cost to the parents.
  • Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP): A plan developed for infants and toddlers with special needs and their families.
  • Individual Transition Plan (ITP): A plan included in a student's IEP beginning at age 16 or younger, addressing transition needs and interagency responsibilities.
  • Extended School Year Services (ESY): Special education services provided outside of the regular school year.
  • Independent Educational Evaluation (IEE): An evaluation conducted by a qualified examiner when a parent disagrees with the results of a school district's evaluation.
  • Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP): A plan developed for students with disabilities that outlines specific accommodations and supports needed for equal access to education.
  • Inclusion: The practice of educating students with disabilities alongside and simultaneously with their non-disabled peers.
  • Assistive Technology: Devices, tools, or software that support individuals with disabilities in performing tasks, enhancing communication, and accessing educational materials effectively.
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by challenges in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors.
  • Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP): A written plan used to address problem behavior, including positive behavioral strategies and support.
  • Due Process: The legal procedure to resolve disputes between parents and schools regarding special education and IEPs.
  • Eligibility Determination: The process of determining whether a student qualifies for special education services based on their identified disability.
  • Emotional/Behavioral Disorder: A condition involving persistent emotional or behavioral patterns that significantly impact a student's academic and social functioning.
  • Evaluation: The process of gathering information and data to assess a student's strengths, weaknesses, abilities, and needs to determine eligibility for special education services.
  • Executive Functioning: Cognitive skills necessary for planning, organizing, initiating tasks, managing time, problem-solving, and self-regulation.
  • Functional Academics: Substitution of life skills as a means for teaching academic tasks.
  • Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA): A systematic strategy for determining the function of challenging behavior.
  • Gross Motor Skills: Functions that require large muscle movements such as running, jumping, or swimming.
  • Inclusion: A philosophy and/or practice focused on educating each child with a disability to the maximum extent appropriate in the school and/or classroom he or she would otherwise attend.
  • Individual Services Plan (ISP): A plan that describes the special education and/or related services that an LEA will provide to an eligible student.
  • Individual Transition Plan (ITP): A plan included in a student's IEP beginning at age 16 or younger, addressing transition needs, interagency responsibilities, and prerequisite skills that a student requires to successfully transition from school to adult life.
  • Intelligence Quotient (IQ): The score obtained on a test of mental ability, usually found by relating a person's test score to his or her age.
  • Interpreter: A professional who signs, gestures, and/or fingerspells a speaker's message as it is spoken to enable individuals who are hearing impaired to understand spoken and who speaks for a person using sign language to be heard.
  • Least Restrictive Environment (LRE): The concept that each child with a disability is to be provided opportunities to be educated with their non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate.
  • Low Incidence Disability: A severe disability with an expected incidence rate of less than 1 percent of the total K-12 population.
  • Occupational Therapy (OT): Services provided by a qualified occupational therapist that remediate daily living skills, fine motor skills, and sensory issues.
  • Other Health Impaired (OHI): Means having limited strength, vitality, or alertness, including a heightened alertness to environmental stimuli that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment.
  • Procedural Safeguards: Procedures that must be followed to protect the rights of parents and their children with disabilities.
  • Section 504: A civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in programs and activities, public and private, that receive federal financial assistance.
  • Specific Learning Disability: A disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in spoken or written language that may have manifested itself in the imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or do mathematical calculations.
  • Speech Language Impairment: When a student has a language or speech disorder that meets one or more of the following: articulation disorder, abnormal voice, fluency disorder, language disorder (receptive or expressive).
  • Surrogate Parent: A person appointed by the SELPA who acts as a child's parent for the purpose of the IEP process or when the child is a ward of the state and the parents do not retain educational rights for the child.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): An acquired injury to the brain caused by an external physical force, resulting in total or partial functional disability or psychosocial impairment, or both, that adversely affects a child's educational performance.
Where are these key terms mentioned at doe.virginia.gov?

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The key terms related to Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) are not specifically mentioned at doe.virginia.gov. However, the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) provides comprehensive information and resources about special education, including IEPs, on its website. The VDOE's Special Education section covers a wide range of topics related to special education, including:
  • Special Education Regulations and Guidelines: This section provides information on state and federal regulations that govern special education, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
  • Special Education Process: This section explains the process of identifying and evaluating students with disabilities, developing IEPs, and providing special education services.
  • Special Education Dispute Resolution: This section outlines the procedures for resolving disputes between parents and schools regarding special education, including mediation and due process hearings.
  • Special Education Forms: This section provides access to various forms related to special education, including IEP forms and forms for requesting an independent educational evaluation.
  • Special Education Resources: This section includes links to various resources, including the Virginia Tiered Systems of Supports (VTSS), which is a framework for providing academic and behavioral supports to all students, including those with disabilities.
While the specific key terms you mentioned are not found on the VDOE's website, the site does provide a wealth of information and resources related to special education and IEPs in Virginia.
Where is this information located on doe.virginia.gov

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The information related to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) can be found at the following links on doe.virginia.gov:
  • Calculation Tool for Least Restrictive Environment (LRE): This page provides a tool for calculating the regular class percent and special education service percent of day, which are key components of determining LRE for individual students.
  • Inclusive Practices: This page discusses the importance of inclusive practices in Virginia's special education programs and includes resources for preschoolers with disabilities, who are entitled to placement in the least restrictive environment.
  • Special Education Indicators: This page includes information on how Virginia reports data on LRE for preschool children with IEPs and school-age students, including the percentage of students included in regular classrooms.
  • Special Education December 1 Child Count: This page provides information on the annual child count, which includes data on LRE for preschool children with IEPs.
  • Individualized Education Program (IEP) & Instruction: This page includes a link to the Calculation Tool for Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) and discusses the importance of LRE in the development of IEPs.
These resources provide guidance on how LRE is implemented and monitored in Virginia's special education programs.
Where is this information listed on law.lis.virginia.gov?

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The information related to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) is listed in several sections of law.lis.virginia.gov:
  • 8VAC20-81-130: This section outlines the requirements for LRE and placements in Virginia, stating that each local educational agency shall ensure that a continuum of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities.
  • 8VAC20-81-10: This section defines "Least Restrictive Environment" (LRE) as ensuring that children with disabilities, including children in public or private schools, are educated with their non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate.
  • 8VAC20-81-230: This section provides general LRE requirements for local educational agencies, stating that each local educational agency shall ensure that, to the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities are educated with their non-disabled peers.
  • 8VAC20-81-250: This section discusses the applicability of LRE and FAPE provisions in state-funded placements, indicating that students with disabilities should be educated in the least restrictive special education setting, in accordance with the requirements of LRE and FAPE.
These sources provide the legal framework for the implementation of LRE in Virginia's special education programs.
Who is talking about this information on linkedin.com?

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Based on the provided LinkedIn posts, there are several people discussing the concept of Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) in special education:
  1. Jeffrey Forte, a special education lawyer, explains what LRE means under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and provides examples of different levels of LRE placements in his post.
  2. Nagla Moussa, an educator, discusses how LRE can be interpreted differently based on a student's individual needs and disabilities.
  3. A special education consultant emphasizes that LRE is not a physical place but a principle of including students with disabilities in the general education environment to the maximum extent appropriate.
  4. The Mighty Rights Press highlights that LRE requires schools to integrate students with disabilities in general education classrooms as much as possible.
  5. Ballou Education LLC explores how LRE in an IEP affects inclusion, going beyond just physical spaces.
  6. John R. Van Plantinga Jr. suggests that LRE starts by allowing students with disabilities to independently engage in routines where they can learn alongside their peers.
  7. Thomas Vaccaro outlines the principles behind LRE as part of navigating special education compliance.
  8. Tara Mohundro emphasizes that placement in the LRE should be individualized for each child to receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) .
These posts highlight the importance of LRE in ensuring students with disabilities are educated alongside their non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate, while also recognizing that LRE implementation should be individualized based on each student's unique needs and disabilities.
Can you place the vdoe sources in a table?

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Can you place the virginia administrative code sources in a table?

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Sure, here is a table with the sources you provided: These sources provide the legal framework for the implementation of Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) in Virginia's special education programs.
In the table can you add a description of the code section mentioned?

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Sure, here's a table with the Virginia Administrative Code sources and a brief description of each code section:
SourceDescription
8VAC20-81-130Outlines the requirements for Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) and placements, ensuring a continuum of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities.
8VAC20-81-10Defines key terms including "Least Restrictive Environment" as ensuring children with disabilities are educated with non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate.
8VAC20-81-230Provides general LRE requirements for local educational agencies, mandating that children with disabilities are educated with non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate.
8VAC20-81-250Discusses the applicability of LRE and FAPE (Free Appropriate Public Education) provisions in state-funded placements, requiring education in the least restrictive setting in accordance with LRE and FAPE.
This table includes the relevant Virginia Administrative Code sections related to Least Restrictive Environment in special education, along with a brief description of what each code section covers.
In the table can you add a description and a link to the code?

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Sure, here's a table with the Virginia Administrative Code sources, a description of each code section, and a link to the code:
SourceDescriptionLink
8VAC20-81-130Outlines the requirements for Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) and placements, ensuring a continuum of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities.https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section130/
8VAC20-81-10Defines key terms including "Least Restrictive Environment" as ensuring children with disabilities are educated with non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate.https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section10/
8VAC20-81-230Provides general LRE requirements for local educational agencies, mandating that children with disabilities are educated with non-disabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate.https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section230/
8VAC20-81-250Discusses the applicability of LRE and FAPE (Free Appropriate Public Education) provisions in state-funded placements, requiring education in the least restrictive setting in accordance with LRE and FAPE.https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section250/
This table includes the relevant Virginia Administrative Code sections related to Least Restrictive Environment in special education, a brief description of what each code section covers, and a link to the full text of the code section.
is there any additional information that needs to be included in the table

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The table covers the key information needed for the Virginia Administrative Code sources related to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) in special education, including:
  1. Source (Code Section)
  2. Description of what the code section covers regarding LRE
  3. Direct link to the full text of the code section
However, here are a few additional details that could be included if needed:
  1. Effective Date - The date the code section went into effect or was last revised
  2. Statutory Authority - The state law or regulation that grants authority for the code section
  3. Chapter/Part - The broader chapter or part of the regulations that the code section falls under
For example, the additional details for 8VAC20-81-130 could be:
SourceDescriptionLinkEffective DateStatutory AuthorityChapter/Part
8VAC20-81-130Outlines LRE requirements and continuum of placementshttps://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section130/7/7/2009§§ 22.1-16 and 22.1-214 of the Code of Virginia8VAC20-81 Special Education Regulations, Part III
So while the core information is covered in the existing table, those additional columns could be incorporated if more comprehensive regulatory details are required. Let me know if you need any other additions to the table.
Create the table again with the included information.

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Here is a table with the requested information for the relevant Virginia Administrative Code sections related to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE):
SourceDescriptionLinkEffective DateStatutory AuthorityChapter/Part
8VAC20-81-130Outlines the requirements for LRE and placements, ensuring a continuum of alternative placements.https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section130/July 7, 2009§§ 22.1-16 and 22.1-214 of the Code of Virginia8VAC20-81 Special Education Regulations, Part III
8VAC20-81-10Defines key terms including "Least Restrictive Environment".https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section10/July 7, 2009§§ 22.1-16 and 22.1-214 of the Code of Virginia8VAC20-81 Special Education Regulations, Part I
8VAC20-81-230Provides general LRE requirements for local educational agencies.https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section230/July 7, 2009§§ 22.1-16 and 22.1-214 of the Code of Virginia8VAC20-81 Special Education Regulations, Part III
8VAC20-81-250Discusses applicability of LRE and FAPE provisions in state-funded placements.https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title8/agency20/chapter81/section250/July 7, 2009§§ 22.1-16 and 22.1-214 of the Code of Virginia8VAC20-81 Special Education Regulations, Part III
This table includes the code section, a brief description, link to the full text, effective date, statutory authority granting the regulation, and the broader chapter/part it falls under in the Virginia Administrative Code. Let me know if you need any other information added.
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