The first flight of Wright brothers

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The first flight of the Wright brothers took place on December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright, had been experimenting with the concepts of flight since 1899, conducting numerous glider experiments and mastering the skills of controlling an aircraft while in flight1. On the day of the first flight, Orville was the first to take off, at 10:35 am, after winning a coin toss. However, his first attempt was unsuccessful as he oversteered with the elevator after leaving the launching rail, causing the flyer to stall and dive into the sand. After making necessary repairs, Orville successfully flew the aircraft, covering a distance of 120 feet (36 meters) in 12 seconds12. The Wright brothers made three more flights that day, taking turns and increasing their distance with each flight. The best flight of the day was made by Wilbur, covering a distance of 852 feet (255.6 meters) in 59 seconds23. The Wright brothers' first powered airplane, known as the Wright Flyer or the Kitty Hawk Flyer, was the result of a sophisticated four-year program of research and development. Their achievement was not only the first flight of an airplane but also the establishment of the foundation of aeronautical engineering2. The Wright brothers' first flight marked the beginning of the aerial age and set in motion a series of events leading to further innovation in the aviation industry3.
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