how have boomerangs been used

Answer
Boomerangs have been used for various purposes, primarily in hunting and, to a lesser extent, in warfare1. There are two main types of boomerangs: returning and non-returning5.
  1. Returning boomerangs: These are mainly used for recreation and can return to the thrower if they do not hit a target5. They can also be used for hunting birds in flight, where a weapon returning from an unsuccessful throw would be advantageous6.
  2. Non-returning boomerangs: These are better designed for hunting purposes, as they are heavy, large, and have a more predictable flight path2. They can be used to hit targets more accurately than other shaped projectiles4.
In warfare, boomerangs were used both as projectiles and as clubs3. Using them as clubs was more common in warfare than in hunting, perhaps because people were more likely to be in close combat situations during battles3.
what are the different types of boomerangs
Answer
There are two main types of boomerangs, each with different characteristics and purposes:
  1. Returning boomerangs: These boomerangs are designed to return to the thrower if they do not hit a target1. They have a specific shape and aerodynamic properties that allow them to follow a curved flight path and come back to the thrower2. Returning boomerangs are often used for recreational purposes and can be used for hunting birds in flight, where a weapon returning from an unsuccessful throw would be advantageous6.
  2. Non-returning boomerangs: Also known as throwsticks or kylies, these boomerangs are designed for hunting and do not return to the thrower3. They are typically larger, heavier, and have a more predictable flight path than returning boomerangs4. Non-returning boomerangs can be used as projectiles for hunting or as clubs in close combat situations, such as warfare3.
In summary, boomerangs can be broadly categorized into returning and non-returning types, with each type serving different purposes, such as recreation, hunting, and warfare.
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