what new archaeological discoveries are reshaping our understanding of ancient civilizations

Answer
Here are some of the key new archaeological discoveries that are reshaping our understanding of ancient civilizations:

Ancient Greece

  • Discovery of stone tools and fossils in Greece dating back over 300,000 years, indicating human presence much earlier than previously thought. This find pushes back the origins of human civilization in Greece by over 250,000 years3.

Ancient Egypt

  • Discovery of 110 tombs from three different eras of Ancient Egypt, providing insights into the lives of officials, priests and military leaders1.
  • Finding of 50 stunning sarcophagi in an Egyptian necropolis, shedding light on burial practices1.
  • Unearthing of a 3,000 year old "lost golden city" near Luxor, one of the largest discoveries since King Tut's tomb5.

Mesopotamia

  • Discovery of a significant ancient palace door threshold in the Iraqi city of Nimrud, offering clues about the city before it was destroyed by ISIS6.

Britain

  • Finding of thousands of prehistoric pits, ditches and buildings in Britain using laser technology, revealing a complex landscape over 7,000 years6.

China

  • Uncovering of 20 new terracotta warriors near the tomb of China's first emperor, adding to our knowledge about this army6.
These discoveries demonstrate how new archaeological findings continue to provide insights into ancient cultures across the world, pushing back our understanding of the origins of civilization and reshaping views of notable ancient societies. Advanced technology combined with diligent fieldwork ensures many exciting discoveries still await.
how has the discovery of the oldest known Greek civilization changed our understanding of ancient Greece
Answer
Here are the key ways the discovery of the oldest known Greek civilization has changed our understanding of ancient Greece:

Pushes back origins of Greek civilization

  • The recent discovery of stone tools and fossils in Greece dating back over 300,000 years indicates a human presence in Greece much earlier than previously thought13.
  • This finding pushes back the origins of human civilization in Greece by over 250,000 years from around 3,000 BCE to over 300,000 years ago3.

Challenges notion of a 'Dark Age'

  • The evidence of sophisticated tools and existence of settlements challenges the concept of a Greek 'Dark Age' from 1200 BCE to 800 BCE where Greek civilization was thought to have collapsed1.
  • Instead, it shows that aspects of Greek civilization like city-states may have emerged earlier, around 1000 BCE rather than 800 BCE1.

Provides fuller picture of early Greek life

  • The artifacts uncovered provide insights into how early Greeks lived - their tools, shelters, resources, and more3.
  • This allows us to reconstruct a fuller picture of life in Greece prior to the peak of ancient Greek civilization around 500 BCE.

Opens up new avenues for research

  • The discovery paves the way for more archaeological exploration into Greece's deep history that predates the Minoans and Mycenaeans3.
  • It opens up entirely new avenues for research to further unravel the origins of Greek civilization.
In summary, the evidence expands our knowledge of human existence in Greece by over 250,000 years and challenges prevailing theories about the timeline of ancient Greek civilization. It provides a window into early Greek life and opens new paths for understanding the roots of this iconic ancient society.
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